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Will at the Battle of Gettysburg

September 11, 2013

Lesson 1

Title of Lesson: Introduction to the Civil War

Day 1 of building background knowledge before beginning class literature book “Will at the Battle of Gettysburg 1863” by Laurie Calkhoven

 

Author of Lesson: Kari Cox and Amber Bledsoe

 

Grade Level: 5th Grade

 

Resources:

The Civil War in Four Minutes video

The Boys’ War by Jim Murphy

Spiral notebooks

Chart paper

Markers

Easel

 

Lesson Summary:  Students get a glance of the Civil War in 4 minutes using a video. A class discussion follows and then the video is reshown. During the second reshowing the teacher will pause it throughout to have students draw their attention to specific objects. Then students take a few notes to help understand the beginning of the war and key terms before the next lesson on boys in the war.

 

 

Grade Level Expectations and/or Common Core Standards in Literacy in History/ Social Studies: 3a. I. Identify political, economical and social causes and consequences of the Civil War and Reconstruction.

 

Key Terms:

 

Yankees

Rebels

Union

Confederate

United States of the Confederate

Seceded

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Historical Background:

 

The Civil War 1861-1865 started because Lincoln was elected President and he wanted to end slavery and keep the Union together as one whole country.  New states were forming in the West, and the South was afraid that all new states would be free slave states. The South feared that if they were the only states with slaves then they would eventually have to let them be free as well. This caused the 11 states that had slaves to succeed from the Union. They wanted to become their own country called the Unites States of the Confederate.

 

 

Anticipatory Set:

 

  • Have students gather close to where the Civil War in 4 Minutes will be shown. Have students watch the whole thing once through.  When it is done ask them to share what they noticed.  (Different colors represent different sides, the movement of the color back and forth over the country, death count in the bottom counter)
  • Watch the video a second time but this time pause it throughout the video to specifically show students various things such as: the first battle, Gettysburg, the Navy appears, the movement of the red onto the blue and vice versa, the blue moving down the Mississippi River, the movement of Sherman’s march to the sea. Have students ask questions and share what they think is happening.

 

 

Do Now Activity:

 

  • Have students take out their spiral notebooks and set it up like their science journals.
  • Start with a title page- Have students sketch a rather large outline of the United States. Have them also include a title such as the Civil War, the date, and their name.  Later students can come back and shade in with color or add more pictures to the title page as they learn about the war.
  • On the next page have them create a table of contents. This is where they add each page title as they study different chapters and books about the Civil War.

 

Procedures:

 

  • Have students title their first page “The Beginning of the Civil War” (Don’t forget they should also call this page 1 and write it in their table of contents).
  • Next have students take notes as you have a class discussion about the beginning of the Civil War.  Model how to take notes using the Cornell note taking format. (See attached sample)

 

Homework:

Have students think about a war back then in 1861.  What was it like? What did they have? What didn’t they have? What would it be like to be a kid back then? Explain that tomorrow they will start to learn about boys their age joining a war back then.

 

Assessment:

Pretest

 

Extension:

 

Have students research an aspect of the war such as, medical, women, general, weapons to help further understand parts of the Civil War that unit will not have time to cover. Then have them create a PowerPoint to share with their classmates.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Beginning of the Civil War

 

Cues

Notes

 

Why it started

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Union

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Confederates

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Start of the Civil War April 12, 1861

 

  • The Civil War 1861-1865 started because Lincoln was elected President and he wanted to end slavery and keep the Union together as one whole country. 
  • New states were forming in the West and the South was afraid they would have to give up their slaves if more states were free. 

 

 

  • The Union was considered the North and were called Yankees by Southerners
  • Had a factory driven economy. They believed in paying people to work.
  • They thought slaves should be free, but not treated as whites. They were still considered different and not equal to whites.
  • Wanted the Nation to stay together as one. Believed in strong central government.

 

 

  • The Confederates were the South and called rebels by Northerners.
  • Had large plantations that produced cotton and tobacco.  They needed a large number of people to help. Therefore they need slavery.
  • Believed it was the states’ rights to make decisions. Not the right of the Union

 

 

  • Confederate troops bombarded a Union held fort called Fort Sumter is in Charleston, South Carolina. 
  • Lincoln did not send help because he wanted to avoid a war if possible.
  • After they attacked Union soldiers left.
  • Now Lincoln was prepared to go to war.

 

 

 

 

 

Name______________________________________________________ Date__________________________

 

Drummer Boy Pre/Post Test

 

1. Was being a drummer boy an important job to have?                            True or False

 

2. List two other jobs of a drummer boy?   _____________________       ______________________

 

3. What was the age of the youngest drummer in the Civil War?     _____________________

 

4. The Civil War the first time drummer boys were used.                           True or False

 

5.  Being a drummer boy was the safest job to have in the Civil War.      True or False

 

6. Name one problem with using drums to signal soldiers.  _____________________________

 

_________________________________________________________________________________________________

 

7. List two important uses of the drumbeat.  ______________________________________________

 

_________________________________________________________________________________________________

 

8. What instrument replaced the drum on the battlefield? ______________________________

 

 

 

Lesson 2 

Title of Lesson: Hands-On Activity: Simulation

 

Author of Lesson: From Meaningful Activities to Generate Interesting Classrooms modified by Kari Cox and Amber Bledsoe

 

Grade Level: 5th Grade

 

Resources: Civil War Stencils handout

 

Lesson Summary: Students are divided in a classroom to represent the population of the North and the South. Students are instructed to reproduce as many copies of Civil War stencils as they can in ten minutes.  A classroom discussion follows that allows students to understand the advantage the North had over the South due to their population of people.

 

Grade Level Expectations and/or Common Core Standards in Literacy in History/ Social Studies: 3a. I. Identify political, economical and social causes and consequences of the Civil War and Reconstruction.

Key Terms: Mason-Dixon Line

 

Historical Background: The Civil War 1861-1865 started because Lincoln was elected President and he wanted to end slavery and keep the Union together as one whole country.  New states were forming in the West and the South was afraid there would be no new free states.

 

The North (Union) called Yankees

  • Had a factory driven economy. They believed in paying people to work.
  • They thought slaves should be free, but not treated as whites. They were still considered different and not equal to whites.
  • Wanted the Nation to stay together as one. Believed in strong central government.

 

The South (United States of the Confederate) called Rebels

  • Had large plantations that produced cotton and tobacco.  They needed a large number of people to help. Therefore they need slavery.
  • Believed it was the states’ rights to make decisions.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Anticipatory Set:

  • Discuss with the class that today they are going to investigate why the North won the Civil War using a hands-on simulation.  First thing they need to do is brainstorm at least ten things that are needed to win the war. (Possibly do as table groups or with partners)

 

  • While students are brainstorming hang the Mason-Dixon Line in the classroom. It should divide the room so that 70 percent of the participants are on one side and 30 percent are on the other. Also place to baskets on your desk. One labeled North and one labeled South.

 

  • Then have students share what answers they came up with. Create a list on the board. (Answers should include: Guns, ammunition, food, uniforms, soldiers, strategy, money, transportation, medical supplies, equipment, and good leaders)

 

  • Next discuss the Mason-Dixon Line. Tell the students which side will represent the North and which side will represent the South. (Optional activity is to discuss leaders on each side and have students elect who their leader will be. Possible leaders are Lincoln, Davis, Grant, and Lee.)

 

Do Now Activity:

  • Pass out the Civil War stencils and scissors for every student. Then have available grey, blue, black, brown, and red construction paper.

 

  • Explain to students that the drawings represent items they said were needed to win a war. Therefore, using these drawings they will need to reproduce as many items as they can. Cut them out on the appropriate color construction paper. You will have ten minutes. 

 

  • Explain that the finished items are to be placed in the baskets marked North and South on your desk. All the items they cut out must be placed in your pile by the moment I call “time.”   Give them a one-minute warning and a ten second count down.  All items need to be cut neatly or they won’t receive credit for them.

 

  • Allow 2 minutes for each side to design a plan on how they will accomplish this task. Then have students begin the ten-minute time. When time is called each side will count the other side’s items. Sort them into piles of similar items before counting. Teams can rejects any that are not cut neatly. If there is a dispute you make the final call.

 

  • On the board make a chart to represent the numbers of items the students made. Make two columns, one for the North and one for the South.  You will need shirts, pants, cannon balls, guns, meat, and a row labeled total.

Procedures:

  • As partners or table groups have students write answers or orally discuss the following questions:
  1. Why do you think the North won the Civil War?
  2. Did the people of the South work less hard than the people of the North?
  3. Did the leaders of the South have a poor strategy or show poor leadership?

 

They should realize it was a numbers game and nothing else. The South worked just as hard if not fought harder.  Show the following comparison so students understand it was a numbers game.

 

                                                                        North                          South

Population                                                     71%                            29%

Bank Deposits                                               81%                            19%

Factories                                                        85%                            15%

Miles of Railroad Track                                72%                            28%

 

 

  • Continue with partners or table groups have students write answers or orally discuss the following questions:
  1. How well did your group work together:
  2. Is there anything you could have done differently in terms of its strategy?
  3. Why would using a simulation such as this help students remember the Civil War?
  4. What was the main goal of this task, what were you suppose to learn?
  5. What details about the Civil War were incorporated into the simulation? (Answers can be leaders, population, Mason-Dixon Line)

 

Homework: Possible homework could be to have students explain what they did and learn to someone else such as a family member. In addition they can ask questions and talk to them about facts they may know about the Civil War.

 

Assessment: Observation of how well students worked, participated, and understood the objective.

 

Extension: Have students do a small research activity on the items the North possessed verse the South.

 

Lesson 3

Title of Lesson: Chapter 1 from A Boy’s War

Building background knowledge before beginning class literature book “Will at the Battle of Gettysburg 1863” by Laurie Calkhoven.

 

Author of Lesson: Kari Cox and Amber Bledsoe

 

Grade Level: 5th Grade

 

Resources:

The Boys’ War by Jim Murphy

Spiral notebooks

Chart paper

Markers

Easel

 

Lesson Summary: Using the book “The Boy’s War” students will partner and teacher read through chapters 1 of “The Boy’s War” while taking notes. Following the chapter they will answer questions using reading literature skills.

 

 

Grade Level Expectations and/or Common Core Standards in Literacy in History/ Social Studies: 3a. I. Identify political, economical and social causes and consequences of the Civil War and Reconstruction.

 

Key Terms:

Invading

Economic

Agriculture

Recruitment

Enlist

 

Historical Background:

Boys during the Civil War were excited to join. They were supposed to be 18 however they often lied or were able to sneak in at a much younger age.

 

Anticipatory Set:

  • Have a class discussion on the previous day’s simulation. Discuss the differences and the importance that population played in the war.  
  • Pass out the books The Boy’s War and have the students preview the chapters, pictures, and text features.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Do Now Activity:

  • Have students create a new journal entry titled Chapter 1 “ So I Became a Soldier” (Have students update the table of contents as well).
  • Model how to take notes in their notebook using the Cornell Note taking format. (see attached sample)

 

Procedures:

  • Start with chapter 1 “So I Became a Soldier” on page 5. Read to the students and have them follow along as you discuss the content. Stop at the end of paragraph 3 page 8 to discuss – Reasons to enlist. Instruct students to write under “cues” Reasons to enlist. Then add notes. (see attached list)
  • Next continuing reading from page 8 to page 13. Stop and have students write under cues “How Boys joined”. Then add notes. (see attached list)
  • Then students should create a page called “Chapter 1 Questions” Have students answer the following questions in their journal.

 

Chapter 1 “Questions

 

1. Compare the boys in the North to the boys in the South as the war was just getting started.

 

2.Reread the 3rd paragraph on page 11 to the end of page 13.   

Was Elisha’s resolution to the problem a good one? Explain why or why not using information from the text to support your explanation.

 

3. If you were a young boy in this time period, what do you think you would do?  Why would you have made that choice? Explain.

 

Homework:

Not applicable

Assessment:

Teacher should observe students’ notes and comprehension of the chapter.

Extension:

Have students research popular songs from the Civil War. The teacher should group students to research songs from the North and some from the South. Then have the students compare. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Chapter 1

 

Cues

Notes

Reasons to enlist

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

How boys joined

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  • Many of the North saw slavery as evil
  • However, the South viewed slavery as necessary
  • The North wanted to bring the South back to the Union
  • Escape boring routine of farm life and adventure
  • The South wanted to defend their homes against the North invading

 

 

  • In the Union you had to be 18 years old
  • Many lied to join, there was no identification proof
  • Some were allowed to join with parent permission
  • Boys could join as musicians (this was a nonfighting position)
  • Union needed over 40,000 musicians and 20,000 served for the South

 

 

 

Lesson 4

Title of Lesson: Chapter 2 Marching off to War

Building background knowledge before beginning class literature book “Will at the Battle of Gettysburg 1863” by Laurie Calkhoven

 

Author of Lesson: Kari Cox and Amber Bledsoe

 

Grade Level: 5th Grade

 

Resources:

The Boys’ War by Jim Murphy

Spiral notebooks

Chart paper

Markers

Easel

 

Lesson Summary:

Grade Level Expectations and/or Common Core Standards in Literacy in History/ Social Studies: 3a. I. Identify political, economical and social causes and consequences of the Civil War and Reconstruction.

 

Key Terms:

Industrial

Manufacture

Regiment

Artillery

 

Historical Background:

Uniforms took a while to manufacture. Therefore both armies had mismatched uniforms. It was common for soldiers to fight in their regular clothes. This often caused confusion and chaos.

 

Anticipatory Set:

  • Review causes and reasons for enlistment. Have students share their answers to the questions they did in chapter 1.

 

 

Do Now Activity:

  • Have students create a new journal entry titled Chapter 2 “ Marching off to War” (Have students update the table of contents as well).
  • Model how to take notes in their notebook using the Cornell Note taking format. (See attached sample)

 

 

 

 

Procedures:

  • Working through the chapter stop first at the end of paragraph 1 on page 17 to discuss the uniform issues- instruct students to write under “cues” Uniform issues. (See attached sample notes)
  • Continue through the 2nd paragraph onto page 21. Under the “cue” section label it Union Army. Then add notes.
  • Next read until the end of paragraph 1 on page 22. Under “cue” label it Confederate Army. Then add notes.
  • Then read to the end of the chapter and label the last “cue” Bullies and add notes.
  • Following the notes have students create a page titled Chapter 2 questions. Have students answer the following questions in their journal

 

Chapter 2 Questions

1.Marching off to war was not easy. Explain some of the problems the boys faced using details from the text to support your answer.

 

2. Compare and Contrast the Union’s and Confederates military style. Use details to support your answer.

 

Homework:

Not applicable

Assessment:

Teacher observes note taking skills and students comprehension of the chapter.

Extension:

Have students research the various uniforms worn throughout the Civil War.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Chapter 2

 

Cues

Notes

Uniform issues

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Union Army

 

 

 

 

 

Confederate Army

 

 

 

 

Bullies

  • Early in the war soldiers wore regular clothes
  • Some units wore uniforms of various colors and styles
  • Volunteers in the South were supposed to furnish their own clothes.
  • These various colors caused confusion and mistakes happened
  • Manufacturing uniforms would take a great deal of time

 

  • Practiced movements whenever possible
  • Younger boys handled the marching well, they were energetic and healthy
  • However, they were not use to taking orders from strangers

 

  • The south had more experience soldiers and officers
  • The south practiced drilled but didn’t have to be as strict, they were more relaxed

 

  • Boys dealt with harassment from older soldiers
  • Soldiers were often tested to see what they could handle

 

 

 

Lesson 5 

Title of Lesson: Creating Your Own Drum Call

 

Author of Lesson: Kari Cox and Amber Bledsoe

 

Grade Level: 5th Grade

 

Resources: Drum call videos on You tube

www.youtube.com/watch?v=xgRtUBaPaLs&edufilter=cMfn0S25Kmdhjmrj3EJBlg

 

Lesson Summary: Students learn and hear several drum calls that boys played in the Civil War. Through creative hands-on experiment students try to create their own drum call with a small group. Afterwards the groups share their beat and explain what the call represents. In addition struggles and problems are discussed throughout and after the process and related to the problems they had during the war.

 

Grade Level Expectations and/or Common Core Standards in Literacy in History/ Social Studies: 3a. I. Identify political, economical and social causes and consequences of the Civil War and Reconstruction.

 

Key Terms: Reveille, execution

 

Historical Background: The North and the South were excited at the beginning of the Civil War. Both sides thought they would win. They thought they were better and were fighting for a better causes. Men and boys on both sides rushed to sign up. Most signed up for adventure, a way out of their life at home, or to show the other side they were right. 

 

Boys on both sides were supposed to be 18 to join the military. If they were under 18 they could have their parents sign for them to join. There was no way to verify age in the 1860’s. If a boy was underage but looked older it was possible to join and they often did.  One option for boys under 18 was to become a drummer boy. This was non-fighting position but was very dangerous. The drummer boys learned many beats that signaled the men what to do and where to go. They stood often in the middle of the fighting.

 

Anticipatory Set:

  • Discuss what students know about boys in the Civil War. Build background if needed on drummer boys and what their jobs were.
  • Have students watch and listen carefully to the videos listed above. Discuss what each drum call was designed for.
  • Have students brainstorm as a table group or with partners what other drum calls would be needed. (Allow about 5 minutes)
  • On the board make a list from the students of what other drum calls could have been used or needed in the war.

 

Do Now Activity:

  • Divide students in to groups of four or five.  Give each student two new pencils unsharpened and something that can represent a drum. (Try different books, folders, desk for which sound you prefer.)
  • Explain that each group is to pick a drum call off of the list to try and create. They will need to do the following:
  1. Decide on a drum call and be able to explain what it means and why it is needed.
  2. Create the drum call with their pretend drums
  3. Practice as a group and fix problems as they arise.
  • Allow students time to practice. Set a timer and tell them how much time you are allowing them. Give them a warning at the half way mark and a few minutes until time is up.

 

Procedures:

  • When time is called have groups share what drum call they have created and what it is meant to represent to the military men.
  • Then lead a discussion in what problems they faced as a group. Using what comments the students make relate it to the Civil War. (For example it was noisy from all the other groups practicing. Then discuss the noise in war with cannons, guns, screaming men and how confusing it must have been to focus.)
  • Discuss other dangers the boys would of faced that they did not have to face like heat, lack of food, exhaustion, difficult to see, ect..
  • Then pose the question, would you have liked to be a drummer boy if you were to young to fight? Why or why not? 

 

Homework: Not applicable

Assessment: Observation of cooperating learning activity and that directions were followed.

Extension: Students can research more about drummer boys during the Civil War.

 

Lesson 6

Title of Lesson: Drumbeats and Bullets

Building background knowledge before beginning class literature book “Will at the Battle of Gettysburg 1863” by Laurie Calkhoven

 

Author of Lesson: Kari Cox and Amber Bledsoe

 

Grade Level: 5th Grade

 

Resources:

The Boys’ War by Jim Murphy

Spiral notebooks

Chart paper

Markers

Easel

 

Lesson Summary:

Grade Level Expectations and/or Common Core Standards in Literacy in History/ Social Studies: 3a. I. Identify political, economical and social causes and consequences of the Civil War and Reconstruction.

 

Key Terms:

Mortar

Muster

Maneuvers

Trench warfare

 

 

 

Historical Background: The North and the South were excited at the beginning of the Civil War. Both sides thought they would win. They thought they were better and were fighting for a better causes. Men and boys on both sides rushed to sign up. Most signed up for adventure, a way out of their life at home, or to show the other side they were right. 

 

Boys on both sides were supposed to be 18 to join the military. If they were under 18 they could have their parents sign for them to join. There was no way to verify age in the 1860’s. If a boy was underage but looked older it was possible to join and they often did.  One option for boys under 18 was to become a drummer boy. This was non-fighting position but was very dangerous. The drummer boys learned many beats that signaled the men what to do and where to go. They stood often in the middle of the fighting.

 

While there were many advantages to drumming, there were also many issues associated with the use of drums to instruct troops. Students need to realize that while drummer was at first considered safe, drummers became targets of snipers and the drumbeats were often difficult to hear in the thick of battle- thus the Civil War would be the last time drummers were used in battle.

Anticipatory Set:

  • Review of character traits of a Civil War soldier, particularly a boy desiring to fight
  • Discuss a review problems faced by boys who signed up to fight
  1. Bullying by older soldiers
  2. Trouble taking orders
  3. Being away from home
  4. Unskilled in shooting, drilling, etc

 

 

 

Do Now Activity:

  • Have students create a new entry in journal title Chapter 4 “ Drumbeats and Bullets” using the Cornell notes format.
  • Partner and teacher read through chapter 4 pages 39-43 and take note on the uses and problems of a drummer boy in the war

 

Procedures:

  • Working through the chapter stopping first at the end of page 40 to discuss uses of the drumbeat- instruct students to write under “cues” uses of the drumbeat
  1. Communicating orders
  2. Calls to muster
  3. Meal time
  4. Marching
  5. Drilling
  6. Battlefield uses- location of troops and maneuvering
  • Under cues instruct students to write importance of drummer –
  1. Vital part of communication
  2. Target of enemy fire
  • Continue reading stopping after paragraph 2 page 41 instruct students to write under cues- Other jobs of a drummer
  1. Carry water
  2. Rub down horses
  3. Gather wood
  4. Cook
  5. Carry wounded soldiers off the battlefield
  6. Assisted in burial details
  7. One was a barber
  • Read next 2 paragraphs on page 41 that focuses on Johnny Clem instruct students to write under cues to write Johnny Clem
  1. Ran away at age 11
  2. Fought at battle of Shiloh
  3. Became a sergeant at age 13
  4. Later would receive awards at medals for service- books written about him
  • Read through page 43 – under “cues” instruct students to write Problems with drumbeats
  1. Sounds of cannon and mortars
  2. Rapid firing of riffles
  3. Shouts of thousands of men made hearing a drum beat difficult
  • Finish reading chapter at the end instruct student to write under “cues” End of the Drummer Boy
  1. Changes in military strategy and improved weapons
  2. Smaller, faster moving units
  3. Trench warfare- didn’t require drummers
  4. Bugles became popular – easier to hear
  5. Civil War last time drummer boys were used
  • After discussion pass out post test to students.

 

Homework:

Not applicable

Assessment:

Post -test

Extension:

If time students could research the Johnny Clem

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 Chapter 4

 

Cues

Notes

Use of the Drumbeat-

 

 

 

 

 

Importance of Drummer

 

 

 

Other jobs of a Drummer

 

 

 

 

 

 

Johnny Clem

 

 

 

 

 

Problems with Drumbeats

 

 

 

 

End of the Drummer Boy

 

  • Communicating orders
  • Calls to muster
  • Meal time
  • Marching
  • Drilling
  • Battlefield uses- location of troops and maneuvering

 

  • Vital part of communication
  • Target of enemy fire

 

  • Carry water
  • Rub down horses
  • Gather wood
  • Cook
  • Carry wounded soldiers off the battlefield
  • Assisted in burial details
  • One was a barber

 

  • Ran away at age 11
  • Fought at battle of Shiloh
  • Became a sergeant at age 13
  • Later would receive awards at medals for service- books written about him

 

  •  Sounds of cannon and mortars
  • Rapid firing of riffles
  • Shouts of thousands of men made hearing a drum beat difficult

 

 

  • Changes in military strategy and improved weapons
  • Smaller, faster moving units
  • Trench warfare- didn’t require drummers
  • Bugles became popular – easier to hear
  • Civil War last time drummer boys were used

 

                                                                                                                                               

 

 

Name______________________________________________________ Date__________________________

 

Drummer Boy Pre/Post Test

 

1. Was being a drummer boy an important job to have?                            True or False

 

2. List two other jobs of a drummer boy?   _____________________       ______________________

 

3. What was the age of the youngest drummer in the Civil War?     _____________________

 

4. The Civil War the first time drummer boys were used.                           True or False

 

5.  Being a drummer boy was the safest job to have in the Civil War.      True or False

 

6. Name one problem with using drums to signal soldiers.  _____________________________

 

_________________________________________________________________________________________________

 

7. List two important uses of the drumbeat.  ______________________________________________

 

_________________________________________________________________________________________________

 

8. What instrument replaced the drum on the battlefield? ______________________________

 

Lesson 7

Title of Lesson:

“Will at the Battle of Gettysburg 1863” by Laurie Calkhoven

 

Author of Lesson: Kari Cox and Amber Bledsoe

 

Grade Level: 5th Grade

 

Resources:
“Will at the Battle of Gettysburg 1863” by Laurie Calkhoven

Smart Notebook of inferring questions for chapters

Spiral notebooks

Chart paper

Markers

Easel

 

Lesson Summary: Students read the literature book “Will at the Battle of Gettysburg 1863” by Laurie Calkhoven. As the class reads the book the students will answer questions in their journal that pertains to various chapters.

 

Grade Level Expectations and/or Common Core Standards in Literacy in History/ Social Studies: 3a. I. Identify political, economical and social causes and consequences of the Civil War and Reconstruction.

RL.5.1  &  RI.5.1

Quote accurately from a text when explaining what the text says explicitly and when drawing inferences from the text.

 

RL.5.2  

Determine a theme of a story, drama, or poem from details in the text, including how characters in a story or drama respond to challenges or how the speaker in a poem reflects upon a topic; summarize the text.

 

RL.5.3  

Compare and contrast two or more characters, settings, or events in a story or drama, drawing on specific details in the text (e.g., how characters interact).

 

 

Key Terms:

Key terms will vary by chapter and student background. Most key terms were covered in previous literature from “The Boy’s War”.

 

Historical Background:

 

The Battle of Gettysburg begins when Union Calvary makes contact with Confederate troops on McPherson’s Ridge to the west of town. The fighting last for three days resulting in the bloodiest battle in the entire war and a Union victory.

 

 

Anticipatory Set:

 

Show the students the following quote by Abraham Lincoln, “A house divided against itself cannot stand.” Then have students in their journal title a new page called Lincoln’s Quote. Have students write what they think this quote means.  Then have a class discussion and share thoughts.

 

Do Now Activity:

This literature unit should take about three weeks to complete. Students will continue to use their spiral notebooks.

 

Have the questions ready to go on the Smartboard or copied and given to students to finish as they complete the chapters.

 

 

Procedures:

 

            Using your Smart Notebook inferring questions read the chapters and stop to have students answer the questions that follow the chapters.

 

Homework:

Complete writing if not done in class 

 

Assessment:

Post -test on inferring/AR test

 

Extension:

 

Students could research and discover the battle of Vicksburg, which was occurring at the same time.

 

Chapter 4 Notes Drumbeats and Bullets

 

Use of the Drumbeat- communicating orders, calls to muster, or meal, marching drills, on the battlefield it told soldiers how and when to maneuver.

 

The Importance of a drummer- Drummers were vital part of communication and often a target of enemy fire.

 

Other jobs of a drummer- carry water, rub down horses, gather wood, cook, carry wounded soldiers off the battlefield, assisted in burial details, one was even a barber.

 

Johnny Clem-  Ran away from home at 11 years of age, At the battle of Shiloh he fought, becomes a sergeant at 13, Later he receives awards and medals and a book was written about him.

 

Problems with the drumbeat- Sound of cannons and mortars, rapid firing of riffles, shouts of thousands of men made hearing a drum beat difficult. 

 

End of the Drummer boy- Changes in military strategies and improved weapons, smaller faster moving units, and trench warfare didn’t require drums. Bugles became popular and the Civil War was the last time drummer boys were used.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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